Blog archive

Receive SSH login notifications through Slack or Discord

I have a problem. Sometimes I'm slightly paranoid about computer security. Sometimes I wonder if the pages I visit are being logged somewhere when I'm on my university network. And when it comes to servers I manage, sometimes I wonder if I'm actually alone or not. Logs aren't enough, as someone clever enough may wipe their footprints after getting access to the server. If you want to reliably track break-in attempts, you'll have to log them outside your server, somewhere where your lurker won't be able to remove the traces. How about one of the many chat applications that are always running on my phone?

Mistakes to avoid when developing Atom feeds

My blog syndicates its new contents through an Atom feed so that people can subscribe to updates. And according to the server logs, people use them (that was the initial point of having them; so, thanks!). However, it wasn’t until recently that I actually read the standard and a few other online sources, when I discovered that a few things, such as the entry identifiers, have been done wrong all this time. I’m documenting these issues publicly in order to save for future reference.

Port tunneling with SSH

Here is another quick one that is also easy to forget. One of the many uses of SSH is local and remote port forwarding. Using local port forwarding, you can set up a socket between a port in your local machine and your SSH server. Whenever a communication is established on that local port, it will be forwarded to the server and then, made. This has some interesting use cases, such as connecting to local services (web administration panels, databases…) or acting as a jump server or just a proxy server.